First Myth: The Top Myth.

The Myth: Great-Headed Garlic is a species of leek.

 

In our first search for information, we read the same statement countless times on so many online resources. We were informed time and time again that Great-Headed Garlic is closer to leeks than to common garlic, that it isn’t truly garlic. We found this a thousand times through Internet searches.

So had we been deceived? Had our work been in vain?

The impression left quite a bitter taste in our mouths…

 The Scientific Research

We realized that the information was very similar—even using the same expressions!—on different websites. Of course, we had a hunch: Could we be fighting against the powerful “copy and paste”…?

 However, we wanted to understand why Great-Headed Garlic wouldn’t truly be garlic but a leek.

We had to consult many scientific documents to understand that it was nothing more than a myth.

In fact, until the 19th century, Great-Headed Garlic and leeks belong to different botanical species, as had been expected.

 However, a 19th-century French botanist (Jacques Étienne Gay) thought that leeks had to belong to the species Allium ampeloprasum. This botanical category also included other vegetables such as Great-Headed Garlic.

So why do leeks and Great-headed Garlic belong to the same botanical species? At the time, plants were classified according to their morphology (particularly the shape of their LEAVES). It should be noted that this idea was not shared by the entire scientific community of the time.

 We still don’t understand why it didn’t much matter to this French botanist that Great-Headed Garlic has a 700 g bulb with cloves and leeks practically don’t have a bulb at all.

 But science has evolved since the 19th century. Great-Headed Garlic has been researched in-depth in the past decade in particular. And the discoveries are spectacular for garlic lovers. It’s time to correct this incomprehensible scientific error!

 Today, science supports the following:

 1) Great-Headed Garlic is a VARIETY IN AND OF ITSELF. It is different from other vegetables such as common garlic, leeks, onions, etc. Scientific studies show that it has its own genetic profile, although it shares certain similarities with common garlic.

 2) Great-Headed Garlic is much closer to common garlic in the chemical composition of its volatile organic compounds than to leeks. These volatile organic compounds are partially responsible for the aroma and flavor. Therefore, it is likely that those who appreciate the taste of garlic will also like Great-Headed Garlic…

 3) According to some studies, Great-Headed Garlic contains high levels of alliin and the compound allicin. Allicin has many benefits, including antibacterial, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticarcinogenic properties. This is primarily found in garlics but not in leeks.

 Today, scientists are calling to correct this historical mistake.

Second Myth: The Bizarre Myth.

The following myth very likely has its origin in the myth we have just disproved: its continuation.

 According to this myth, Great-Headed Garlic is so mild that it can be added to salads! As before, we see the same content reproduced on many different websites. Again, “copy and paste” was likely responsible for this myth.

 What better way to find out how this salad tastes than by preparing it? We really wanted to try the salad that many have advertised online. It was another disappointment…

This salad does not exist. The recipes we found call for Great-Headed Garlic but roasted, not raw!

 This myth actually made us suspicious when we read it: Raw Great-Headed Garlic really burns…

First Myth: The Top Myth.

The Myth: Great-Headed Garlic is a species of leek.

 

In our first search for information, we read the same statement countless times on so many online resources. We were informed time and time again that Great-Headed Garlic is closer to leeks than to common garlic, that it isn’t truly garlic. We found this a thousand times through Internet searches.

So had we been deceived? Had our work been in vain?

The impression left quite a bitter taste in our mouths…

 

 

The Scientific Research

 

We realized that the information was very similar—even using the same expressions!—on different websites. Of course, we had a hunch: Could we be fighting against the powerful “copy and paste”…?

 

However, we wanted to understand why Great-Headed Garlic wouldn’t truly be garlic but a leek.

We had to consult many scientific documents to understand that it was nothing more than a myth.

In fact, until the 19th century, Great-Headed Garlic and leeks belong to different botanical species, as had been expected.

 

However, a 19th-century French botanist (Jacques Étienne Gay) thought that leeks had to belong to the species Allium ampeloprasum. This botanical category also included other vegetables such as Great-Headed Garlic.

So why do leeks and Great-headed Garlic belong to the same botanical species? At the time, plants were classified according to their morphology (particularly the shape of their LEAVES). It should be noted that this idea was not shared by the entire scientific community of the time.

 We still don’t understand why it didn’t much matter to this French botanist that Great-Headed Garlic has a 700 g bulb with cloves and leeks practically don’t have a bulb at all.

 But science has evolved since the 19th century. Great-Headed Garlic has been researched in-depth in the past decade in particular. And the discoveries are spectacular for garlic lovers. It’s time to correct this incomprehensible scientific error!

 Today, science supports the following:

 1) Great-Headed Garlic is a VARIETY IN AND OF ITSELF. It is different from other vegetables such as common garlic, leeks, onions, etc. Scientific studies show that it has its own genetic profile, although it shares certain similarities with common garlic.

 2) Great-Headed Garlic is much closer to common garlic in the chemical composition of its volatile organic compounds than to leeks. These volatile organic compounds are partially responsible for the aroma and flavor. Therefore, it is likely that those who appreciate the taste of garlic will also like Great-Headed Garlic…

 3) According to some studies, Great-Headed Garlic contains high levels of alliin and the compound allicin. Allicin has many benefits, including antibacterial, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticarcinogenic properties. This is primarily found in garlics but not in leeks.

 Today, scientists are calling to correct this historical mistake.

Second Myth: The Bizarre Myth.

The following myth very likely has its origin in the myth we have just disproved: its continuation.

 According to this myth, Great-Headed Garlic is so mild that it can be added to salads! As before, we see the same content reproduced on many different websites. Again, “copy and paste” was likely responsible for this myth.

 What better way to find out how this salad tastes than by preparing it? We really wanted to try the salad that many have advertised online. It was another disappointment…

This salad does not exist. The recipes we found call for Great-Headed Garlic but roasted, not raw!

 This myth actually made us suspicious when we read it: Raw Great-Headed Garlic really burns…