Great-Headed Garlic is also called Elephant Garlic.

It is a DIFFERENT VARIETY of garlic from common garlic. Scientists classify them as Allium ampeloprasum var. ampeloprasum and Allium sativum, respectively.

The differences between the two varieties are notable since not only is Great-Headed Garlic a much taller plant than common garlic, but its bulb is also up to three times larger.

Did you know that Great-Headed Garlic bulbs can weigh 700 grams?!

As for the taste of Great-Headed Garlic? There are clear differences between Great-Headed Garlic and common garlic in terms of aroma and flavor. This dissimilarity is expected given the specific composition of Great-Headed Garlic (such as its sulfuric compounds and amino acids, for example). In our opinion, Great-Headed Garlic primarily differs from common garlic in its mysterious final notes…

Could this be related to the fact that Great-Headed Garlic grows for 9 months in the rainy conditions of Chiloé Island (where it rains up to 3,000 mm a year!)? It is undeniable that the flavor and aroma of any vegetable is partially dependent on agroclimatic conditions.

Great-Headed Garlic is also called Elephant Garlic.

It is a DIFFERENT VARIETY of garlic from common garlic. Scientists classify them as Allium ampeloprasum var. ampeloprasum and Allium sativum, respectively.

The differences between the two varieties are notable since not only is Great-Headed Garlic a much taller plant than common garlic, but its bulb is also up to three times larger.

Did you know that Great-Headed Garlic bulbs can weigh 700 grams?!

As for the taste of Great-Headed Garlic? There are clear differences between Great-Headed Garlic and common garlic in terms of aroma and flavor. This dissimilarity is expected given the specific composition of Great-Headed Garlic (such as its sulfuric compounds and amino acids, for example). In our opinion, Great-Headed Garlic primarily differs from common garlic in its mysterious final notes…

Could this be related to the fact that Great-Headed Garlic grows for 9 months in the rainy conditions of Chiloé Island (where it rains up to 3,000 mm a year!)? It is undeniable that the flavor and aroma of any vegetable is partially dependent on agroclimatic conditions.